Politics

111: The Gang of Seven

The biggest party split in nearly 40 years. Seven Labour MPs have walked, but it’s clear dozens more have had enough. Even the deputy leader, Tom Watson, calls for change. It’s a huge challenge for Jeremy Corbyn, explored in this bonus podcast.

Why have the gang of seven gone now? Will anyone follow them? And what becomes of the Independent Group? Will it become a new party of the centre? Or will it fizzle out?

And how will Labour react? Has it in fact further strengthened Jeremy Corbyn’s hold on the party?

110: Aren't we in hell already?

Once again, Theresa May kicks the can down the road, pleading with MPs to give her just a little more time. But time is running out. Maybe that’s the point. We round up the latest Brexit madness in the latest podcast.

Despite all that, Labour still find time to indulge in another internal party war. We look at how Luciana Berger became the latest target, and how leaders again failed to respond properly.

Plus the Conservative MP who can’t stop blocking moves to protect women and young girls, and we pause to consider the achievements of Chris Grayling, perhaps the least talented man to ever hold Cabinet office.

109: Six Impossible Things Before Brexit

It seems that, in order to honour the 2016 referendum result, we must echo Alice in Wonderland, and try to believe Six Impossible Things Before Brexit.

Theresa May has now made ideas previously dismissed as “delusional” central parts of her government’s Brexit policy. Now all she has to do is persuade the EU to go along with it — and she has less than two weeks to do it.

What does she want? We don’t really know. How will she get it? We don’t know that either.

So it makes perfect sense for us to try to figure out what’s likely to happen next as we blunder along this catastrophic road, kicking that battered can even further in the hope something magical might appear to make all this go away.

108: The Rollercoaster of Hell

At a time when every week feels like a momentous one, this week really was. We’ll be talking about this week’s events years from now, so let's try to make sense of it all.

Theresa May suffers the worst defeat any government’s endured in more than a century, and of course does not resign, or even seem to think there’s anything particularly wrong.

Instead she invites rivals to talks, while insisting she won’t budge on her red lines, which isn’t strictly speaking a negotiation.

Meanwhile Jeremy Corbyn refuses to even talk. Just another calm, peaceful week in Brexit Britain.

We look at whether our rival tribes will ever be able to put the national interest first (spoiler: almost certainly not), and try to figure out what might happen next.


107: What fresh hell is this?

Theresa May suffers the heaviest defeat any Prime Minister has endured in at least a century. Her Brexit plan lies in tatters. And yet she limps on.


A brief emergency update after the extraordinary events in the House of Commons. Jeremy Corbyn calls a confidence vote, which he will lose — but it won’t bring Labour any closer to backing a referendum.


Will we even leave the EU in March? Paul Osbourne and Robert Meakin try to pick through the wreckage of the latest Brexit catastrophe.