Lib Dem

126: Looking for Leadership

At our moment of greatest political crisis, a leadership vacuum opens up. Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt trade undeliverable promises, on Brexit and bribes for voters. But how many of the people choosing between them are really Conservatives?

Labour again fails to confront anti-semitism in the party — suspending, re-admitting and then suspending Chris Williamson. So what does someone actually have to do to be thrown out of the Labour Party? And are the civil service really plotting to keep Jeremy Corbyn out of Downing Street.

We look too at the Liberal Democrats’ leadership campaign, which could be a lot more significant than you might think.

And the Brexit Party turn up in Strasbourg, and make idiots of themselves. Obviously.

122: A Howl of Outrage

Just days after news of Theresa May’s resignation comes the biggest electoral kicking the Conservatives have ever faced. The utter humiliation of coming fifth in the European Elections, with fewer than 1-in-10 votes.

Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party grinds the government into the ground — but what happens next? Can his movement move on? Or will the Tories just embrace a no-deal Brexit under a new leader?

Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrats punish Labour for its ambiguity on Brexit, but there’s little immediate sign Jeremy Corbyn will pay any attention.

We work through the results of the EU vote, as well as making an early assessment of the rival candidates going for the Tory leadership.


120: The Ultimate Protest Vote

Staring into the abyss, the Prime Minister decides to have another go at getting Brexit through the Commons. At the same time as leading the Conservatives to what's likely to be their worst-ever election performance. Might this, finally, be the thing that ends Theresa May's time in Downing Street?

We assess the latest attempts to resolve the Brexit impasse, and look ahead to the European Election that are likely to be the angriest vote in years. Is this a temporary blip? Or has Brexit permanently broken Britain's political system?

Plus, 25 years after his premature death, we imagine what the world might have looked like had John Smith not died in 1994, and instead led Labour into government.

119: Shut up and go Huawei

Usually, the sacking of a Cabinet minister on suspicion of leaking from a top secret meeting would be the biggest crisis for a government in any given week. But this is Theresa May’s government, so she follows it up with a catastrophic kicking in the local elections, and the certainty of it getting even worse in the EU elections later this month

Labour had a poor night too — but other sides say it means voters want them to get a deal done on Brexit. Are they right? We work through the results.

Gavin Williamson, meanwhile, leaves the MoD to spend more time with his instagram feed. But is he the victim of a miscarriage of justice? And what will he do next?

All this, and the first ever case of an MP being sacked by their own voters, triggering a very interesting by-election.


108: The Rollercoaster of Hell

At a time when every week feels like a momentous one, this week really was. We’ll be talking about this week’s events years from now, so let's try to make sense of it all.

Theresa May suffers the worst defeat any government’s endured in more than a century, and of course does not resign, or even seem to think there’s anything particularly wrong.

Instead she invites rivals to talks, while insisting she won’t budge on her red lines, which isn’t strictly speaking a negotiation.

Meanwhile Jeremy Corbyn refuses to even talk. Just another calm, peaceful week in Brexit Britain.

We look at whether our rival tribes will ever be able to put the national interest first (spoiler: almost certainly not), and try to figure out what might happen next.