Brexit Party

126: Looking for Leadership

At our moment of greatest political crisis, a leadership vacuum opens up. Boris Johnson and Jeremy Hunt trade undeliverable promises, on Brexit and bribes for voters. But how many of the people choosing between them are really Conservatives?

Labour again fails to confront anti-semitism in the party — suspending, re-admitting and then suspending Chris Williamson. So what does someone actually have to do to be thrown out of the Labour Party? And are the civil service really plotting to keep Jeremy Corbyn out of Downing Street.

We look too at the Liberal Democrats’ leadership campaign, which could be a lot more significant than you might think.

And the Brexit Party turn up in Strasbourg, and make idiots of themselves. Obviously.

122: A Howl of Outrage

Just days after news of Theresa May’s resignation comes the biggest electoral kicking the Conservatives have ever faced. The utter humiliation of coming fifth in the European Elections, with fewer than 1-in-10 votes.

Nigel Farage’s Brexit Party grinds the government into the ground — but what happens next? Can his movement move on? Or will the Tories just embrace a no-deal Brexit under a new leader?

Meanwhile, the Liberal Democrats punish Labour for its ambiguity on Brexit, but there’s little immediate sign Jeremy Corbyn will pay any attention.

We work through the results of the EU vote, as well as making an early assessment of the rival candidates going for the Tory leadership.


120: The Ultimate Protest Vote

Staring into the abyss, the Prime Minister decides to have another go at getting Brexit through the Commons. At the same time as leading the Conservatives to what's likely to be their worst-ever election performance. Might this, finally, be the thing that ends Theresa May's time in Downing Street?

We assess the latest attempts to resolve the Brexit impasse, and look ahead to the European Election that are likely to be the angriest vote in years. Is this a temporary blip? Or has Brexit permanently broken Britain's political system?

Plus, 25 years after his premature death, we imagine what the world might have looked like had John Smith not died in 1994, and instead led Labour into government.